Life and love on the road


NICK EICHER, HOST: Today is Tuesday, September 22nd. Thank you for turning to WORLD Radio to help start your day. Good morning. I’m Nick Eicher.

MARY REICHARD, HOST: And I’m Mary Reichard. Coming next on The World and Everything in It: what one Georgia family is willing to do in order someday to make it to the mission field.

WORLD Senior Correspondent Myrna Brown has their story.

AUDIO: [CARS PASSING]

MYRNA BROWN, REPORTER: In the corner of a northeast Georgia parking lot, a white school bus straddles eight parking spaces.

MARSHALL FRASIER: We’re in there ok? Yes sir. 

Standing beside the bus, holding a red container and a 12-inch funnel: Marshall Frasier and his teenage daughter, Jessie. 

MARSHALL FRASIER: This is our homemade mechanism to fill up with gas. How much gas does it take? It holds 3 gallons exactly. 

AUDIO: [GENERATOR CRANKS]

Just enough to crank up the family’s generator. It powers the bus when it’s not moving. The Frasiers know almost everything about this 71-passenger Blue Bird. They’ve spent the last six months transforming it into a home. 

REBECCA FRASIER: Come on in.

Rebecca Frasier, Marshall’s wife of 22 years, shows off the colorful, patterned cushions they sit on when the bus is moving. But at night… 

REBECCA: It folds out to be a full-size bed. 

That’s where 8-year-old Cayson and 6 ½-year-old Caegan sleep.

REBECCA: The kitchen! This is my favorite thing on the bus. Why is that? This was our dining room table that we cut in half and sanded down. 

Between the kitchen counter and the bathroom, four themed bunk beds for 17-year-old Caeli, 15-year-old Jessie, 11-year-old Catriel and 10-year-old Cairistine. Taking up the rear, a tiny space for Marshall and Rebecca, with words like love, joy, peace and patience written on the wall.

REBECCA: You can’t travel in a bus with eight people, close quarters without a constant reminder of the fruit of the spirit. 

Their journey began about six hours north in Roanoke, Virginia. In 20-16 Marshall planted a church there.

MARSHALL: The second year I started praying, okay God, what’s going on here? Okay God, I’m realizing I’m making mistakes. I’m not seeking after you. Okay God, what do I do differently. And I really started seeking God. My  whole family did it. It was actually amazing. 

Four years later, the Frasiers have traded the comforts of their 2,800 square foot, brick home for the challenges of a 35×9 school bus. 

REBECCA: Hey, we’re here this morning leaving Roanoke. It’s Sunday morning and we are on the bus. (clapping)

They keep friends and family up to date through social media. 

REBECCA: So, what have people said to us that would be like scoffers or haters? The same kind of things that were said to us when we chose to have eight children, instead of the typical 2.5. But we would rather follow God and make God happy than worry about what man has to say.  

Their ultimate goal is to one day serve in Costa Rica, but until they’re able to get there, the Frasiers are traveling around the country sharing their story.

MARSHALL: We just want to love on people and encourage people. Show them what it’s like to trust and follow God and how God blesses you. 

15-year old Jessie keeps a family video journal.  It’s a skill that’s become part of her homeschool lesson plan.

JESSIE: So we just arrived at our first location. Dad’s hooking up the electrical stuff in the rain.  

AUDIO: [KITCHEN SOUNDS]

17-year-old Caeli is learning about entrepreneurship.  While in Georgia, the Frasiers are visiting long-time friends and taking advantage of appliances that aren’t powered by a generator.  

CAELIE: So I’m making cinnamon rolls right now. We’re actually making them to sell in the neighborhood we’re in.  

According to Catriel and Cayson, no two days on the road are alike. 

CATRIEL: The best part is I get to go around and meet other people and tell them about Jesus. 

BROWN: What’s the not so great part about living and traveling on a bus? CAYSON: Sometimes we go to places and then we have to leave our friends.

REBECCA: The biggest obstacle of living like this would be less alone time for my husband and I.

Not to mention traveling during a global pandemic and managing dwindling resources. But the Frasiers say the challenges are drawing them closer to each other and to God. 

MARSHALL: He’s got a plan. He’s got the dream. He’s got the vision and we’re just following Him step by step. He’ll open doors up and we’ll keep following Him. 

Reporting for WORLD in Jefferson, Georgia I’m Myrna Brown.

CAEGAN: How much longer until we’re there? Did you say how much longer until we get there…


REICHARD: If you’d like to see the Fraisers’ converted bus home, Myrna also produced this story for WORLD Watch. We’ll post a link to her video story in the program transcript at worldandeverything.org


(Photo/Myrna Brown)

WORLD Radio transcripts are created on a rush deadline. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of WORLD Radio programming is the audio record.

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